440+ former police officers placed on national Disapproved Register

Disapproved Register: Police numbers published

Report informationSource
More than 440 former police officers were placed on a national Disapproved Register in its first 12 months, the College of Policing said today.

A total of 444 officers ranging in rank from police constable to superintendent were placed on the list to prevent them from re-entering the police service.

440+ former police officers placed on national Disapproved Register

More than 440 former police officers were placed on a national Disapproved Register in its first 12 months.


The College of Policing’s Disapproved Register became effective from 1st December 2013. Since then police forces have been providing details of those officers who have been dismissed from the service or who either resigned or retired while subject to a gross misconduct investigation where there would have been a case to answer.

All 43 forces across England and Wales, as well as British Transport Police and Ministry of Defence Police, provided names to the College of Policing to include on the register.

The majority of officers were put on the register as a result of a complaint from a colleague.
Out of 444 misconduct cases, a total of 405 (91 per cent) are the result of internal complaints and investigations arising from reports by colleagues, while 39 (nine per cent) came from members of the public.

This shows the police are effective at investigating misconduct and officers and police staff are confident in coming forward to report other colleagues.

The figures are broken down by rank and show the number of police constables who left due to misconduct was 371; sergeant 47; inspector 20; chief inspector 4; superintendent 2.

The register details the categories of misconduct and shows the highest number of officers left the service due to data misuse (59 officers), followed by a failure to perform duty (50) and giving false evidence (41).

A total of 269 cases (61 per cent) related to on-duty conduct.

College of Policing Chief Executive, Chief Constable Alex Marshall, said: “The College is committed to being open with the public about the number of officers who have left the police service and the reasons why.

“It is encouraging to see 91 per cent of misconduct cases came from internal complaints and investigations. This shows the willingness of police officers and forces to confront unacceptable behaviour and use the formal misconduct mechanisms to hold offenders to account.

“Confidence remains high in policing with a recent poll showing 66 per cent of the public who were asked said they generally trusted police to tell the truth, which is the highest figure since 1983.

“In the past 12 months the College has created a Code of Ethics for everyone in policing and has improved transparency by publishing a register of chief officers’ pay, business interests and gifts and hospitality.

“As the professional body for police, we will continue to develop officers and staff while protecting the public and reducing crime.”

Notes to editors:

  • Ipsos MORI poll on trust in the police published 5 January 2015.
  • At this time police gross misconduct hearings are not generally open to the public (except in exceptional circumstances). While this remains the case, information that may lead to the identification of individual officers cannot be released. The College is working with the Home Office as part of its public consultation to allow police disciplinary hearings to be held in public. Depending on the outcome, the College may be in a position to name those officers on the Disapproved Register in a proportionate way in future.
  • The number of officers resigning or retiring who are under investigation for misconduct could reduce next year following a statement in January 2015 from the Home Office in relation to police officer regulations.

Transparency Project – Misconduct Figures Report

Objective:

To provide greater transparency to the outcomes of police misconduct cases. Information The College of Policing ‘Disapproved Register’ became effective from 1st December 2013. Since then police forces have been providing details of those officers who have been dismissed from the service or who either resigned or retired while subject to a gross misconduct investigation where it had been determined there would have been a case to answer. At this time police gross misconduct hearings are not generally open to the public (except in exceptional circumstances). While this remains the case information that may lead to the identification of individual officers cannot be released. Currently the Register relates to all Home Office forces in England & Wales, British Transport Police and the Ministry of Defence Police.

Disapproved Register Figures

The figures relate to leavers between 1/12/13 to 30/11/2014.

Ranks of officers leaving due to misconductNumber
Total444
Police Constable371
Police Sergeant47
Police Inspector20
Police Chief Inspector4
Police Supt2
Outcome of casesNumber
Total444
Total number of officers dismissed199
Total number of officers resigning while subject to gross misconduct investigation217
Total number of officers retiring while subject to gross misconduct investigation28
Rank/OutcomeDismissedResignedRetiredTotal
Total19921728444
Police Constable15220019371
Police Sergeant3013447
Police Inspector142420
Police Chief Inspector2204
Police Supt1012

Categories of Misconduct

The circumstances surrounding some acts of misconduct are unique and do not easily fit into a broader category. Alternatively, some officers’ behaviour may fall into more than one category; in this case, the most serious has been selected.

Categories of misconductDismissedResignedRetiredTotal
Total19921728444
Data misuse2529559
Relationship with vulnerable person1223136
Fraud related1913032
Giving false evidence/lying2718146
Domestic Abuse818329
Failure to perform duty1627750
Theft148224
Sexual conduct towards colleagues68115
Racist, homophobic behaviour103013
Drink drive68115
Drugs related66012
Assault on duty54211
Child sex offences5005
Other4052597
In total, 269 (out of 444) cases related to on duty conduct (61%).

Out of 444 misconduct cases, a total of 405 (91%) came from internal complaints and investigations, while 39 (9%) came from members of the public. This shows the willingness of police officers and forces to confront unacceptable behaviour and use the formal misconduct mechanisms to hold offenders to account.

N.B. Statistics relate to 43 forces of England & Wales and BTP and MOD police.

Responsibility for the information and views set out in this article lies entirely with the author(s).

External link: Numbers on police Disapproved Register published
Published: 5 March 2016
Author: College of Policing


External link: Disapproved Register (PDF, 112KB)
Published: –
Author: College of Policing


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